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A new space has opened at the Millennium Library for people to get creative.

The City of Winnipeg today officially opened the ideaMILL on the third floor of the downtown library.

Mayor Brian Bowman calls it a really important addition to Winnipeg's libraries.

"Being centrally located, it's accessible to Winnipeggers from every corner of the city. So, it's an exciting day," he says.

The ideaMILL features tools and technology to help people create in a variety of different media. The space includes a media studio with computers that have graphics and design tools, two sound booths, VHS and audio digital conversion, photography and video equipment, a green screen, 3D printers, and a craft room with sewing machines. The 3D printer actually made the scissors used to cut the ribbon today.

Barbara Bourrier-Lacroix is the Winnipeg Public Library acting administrative coordinator of virtual services. She says they surveyed the community to find out what sorts of tools and technology should go in the maker space. Both Bourrier-Lacroix and manager of library services Ed Cuddy say the space will evolve as time goes on.

"It's like how we plan all of our services. A lot of it is based on input from the community, whether we do that formally or whether we just hear about it as people are using library services. We try and engage with customers to find out whether we're meeting their needs, if we're missing areas of service," says Cuddy.

Bourrier-Lacroix says five years from now she'd like to see the ideaMILL as a hub for creativity and innovation.sound boothOne of two sound booths

"Where we might have students coming in and using our green screens, making their own videos. I'd love to see artists come in, record their own tracks for an upcoming album," says Bourrier-Lacroix. "The use of it is going to dictate how it evolves."

Cuddy says the opening of the space isn't a finish it's a start.

To use the ideaMILL you only need a Winnipeg library card. It is open during regular operating hours. Some of the stations, like the sound booths, must be booked. There will also be programming offered.

"We'll have both passive programming where we'll just make the equipment available or show customers how to use our different tools and equipment, and then we'll also have the more traditional guided programming where we'll be in the classroom setting, maybe talking about how to design your own 3D print; the possibilities are endless at this point," says Bourrier-Lacroix.

The budget for the project was $500,000, approved in the city's 2016 capital budget. The sewing machines and interactive projector were funded by Friends of the Winnipeg Public Library.