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Let's kick off the new year with some great reads with Chris Hall from McNally Robinson Booksellers, You can watch the interview here.

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The Power, by Naomi Alderman

In THE POWER, the world is a recognizable place: there's a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power--they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets.

From award-winning author Naomi Alderman, THE POWER is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways.

One of the New York Times's Ten Best Books of 2017

A Los Angeles Times Best Book of 2017
One of the Washington Post's Ten Best Books of 2017
An NPR Best Book of 2017
One of Entertainment Weekly's Ten Best Books of 2017
A Bustle Best Book of 2017
A Paste Magazine Best Novel of 2017
A San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2017
Winner of the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction

One of President Obama's favorite reads of 2017

"The Power is our era's The Handmaid's Tale." --Ron Charles, Washington Post

"Novels based on premises like the one at the core of The Power can quickly become little more than thought experiments, but Alderman dodges this trap deftly -- her writing is beautiful, and her intelligence seems almost limitless. She also has a pitch-dark sense of humor that she wields perfectly." --Michael Schaub, NPR

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

An Amazon Best Book of 2017

**WINNER OF THE 2017 BAILEYS WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION**

What would happen if women suddenly possessed a fierce new power?

 

 

 

 

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Watching You, by Lisa Jewell

Melville Heights is one of the nicest neighborhoods in Bristol, England; home to doctors and lawyers and old-money academics. It's not the sort of place where people are brutally murdered in their own kitchens. But it is the sort of place where everyone has a secret. And everyone is watching you.

As the headmaster credited with turning around the local school, Tom Fitzwilliam is beloved by one and all--including Joey Mullen, his new neighbor, who quickly develops an intense infatuation with this thoroughly charming yet unavailable man. Joey thinks her crush is a secret, but Tom's teenaged son Freddie--a prodigy with aspirations of becoming a spy for MI5--excels in observing people and has witnessed Joey behaving strangely around his father.

One of Tom's students, Jenna Tripp, also lives on the same street, and she's not convinced her teacher is as squeaky clean as he seems. For one thing, he has taken a particular liking to her best friend and fellow classmate, and Jenna's mother--whose mental health has admittedly been deteriorating in recent years--is convinced that Mr. Fitzwilliam is stalking her.

Meanwhile, twenty years earlier, a schoolgirl writes in her diary, charting her doomed obsession with a handsome young English teacher named Mr. Fitzwilliam...

In Lisa Jewell's latest brilliant "bone-chilling suspense" (People) no one is who they seem--and everyone is hiding something. Who has been murdered--and who would have wanted one of their neighbors dead? As "Jewell teases out her twisty plot at just the right pace" (Booklist, starred review), you will be kept guessing until the startling revelation on the very last page.

 

 

 

 

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Orwell on Freedom, by George Orwell

'Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two equals four. If that is granted, all else follows.'

GEORGE ORWELL is one of the world's most famous social commentators. His writing opposed imperialism, sought to expose the unjust sufferings of the poor and unemployed and warned us against totalitarianism. This selection, from both his novels and non-fiction, charts his thoughts on FREEDOM: from individual liberty and character, to the nature of society and technology, to political liberty, revolution and the importance of free speech. His clear-eyed ambition to create a fairer and more egalitarian society is essential inspiration as we strive to make the world a better place for all.

 

 

 

 

 

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Do You Really Need It, by Pierre-Yves Mcsween

Do you need it? Do you really need it? Pierre-Yves McSween applies this simple question to all the decisions that have a direct effect on our bank accounts. Do You Really Need It? holds up a mirror to our life choices and their consequences. McSween questions our spending habits and assumptions, stressing the need for a fresh outlook on building financial flexibility.
Mixing sound advice with humour and a touch of philosophy, McSween looks at some forty different topics, questioning what you Really Need: credit cards, brand-name products, a new car (or a used one), marriage, kids, life insurance, RRSPs and TFSAs, vacations, a will. In each chapter McSween makes his case and ends with his summary of whether you do, in fact, REALLY need it.
Do You Really Need It? covers money matters with zero BS and no holds barred, offering clever strategies for you to question consumerist impulses and fill in your financial knowledge gaps. McSween seeks first to define the behaviour of a responsible citizen; and then to show readers how to achieve a little more freedom in their lives--something they really, truly need.

 

 

 

 

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Woman at 1000 Degrees, by Hallgrimur Helgason

Herra Björnsson is at the beginning of the end of her life. Oh, she has two weeks left, maybe three--she has booked her cremation appointment, at a crispy 1,000 degrees, so it won't be long. But until then she has her cigarettes, a World War II-era weapon, some Facebook friends, and her memories to sustain her.

And what a life this remarkable eighty-year-old narrator has led. In the internationally bestselling and award-winning Woman at 1,000 Degrees, which has been published in fourteen languages, noted Icelandic novelist Hallgrímur Helgason has created a true literary original. From Herra's childhood in the remote islands of Iceland, where she was born the granddaughter of Iceland's first president, to teen years spent living by her wits alone in war-torn Europe while her father fought on the side of the Nazis, to love affairs on several continents, Herra Björnsson moved Zelig-like through the major events and locales of the twentieth century. She wed and lost husbands, had children, fled a war, kissed a Beatle, weathered the Icelandic financial crash, and mastered the Internet. She has experienced luck and betrayal and upheaval and pain, and--with a bawdy, uncompromising spirit--she has survived it all.

Now, as she awaits death in a garage in Reykjavík, she shows us a woman unbowed by the forces of history. Each part of Herra's story is a poignant piece of a puzzle that comes together in the final pages of this remarkable, unpredictable, and enthralling novel.