Classic 107 - Winnipeg's classical and jazz radio station.

You love our classical and jazz recordings of the month with McNally Robinson Booksellers. Well, starting this month, we're expanding our partnership with McNally to include, what else? BOOKS! Check out our first installment of WHAT TO READ!

Join Michael Wolch, the first Friday of every month when he invites McNally Robinson Booksellers co-owner Chris Hall into the Classic 107 studio to talk books! Chris will pick a handfull of both fiction and non-fiction books that have struck his fancy and he thinks you should be reading.

Here are Chris' picks for WHAT TO READ in September:

Swing Time by Zadie Smith. Swing Time Zadie Smith

A New York Times bestseller
Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction
Finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize for Fiction

An ambitious, exuberant new novel moving from northwest London to West Africa, from the multi-award-winning author of White Teeth and On Beauty

Two brown girls dream of being dancers--but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, about black bodies and black music, about what constitutes a tribe, or makes a person truly free. It's a close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties, never to be revisited, but never quite forgotten, either.
Dazzlingly energetic and deeply human, Swing Time is a story about friendship and music and stubborn roots, about how we are shaped by these things and how we can survive them. Moving from northwest London to West Africa, it is an exuberant dance to the music of time.

 

 

 

 

 

At the Stranger's Gate by Adam GopnikAtTheStrangersGateAdamGopnik

A vivid memoir that captures the energy, ambition and romance of New York in the 1980s from the beloved New Yorker Canadian writer, to stand alongside his bestselling Paris to the Moon and Through the Children's Gate.

When Adam Gopnik and his soon-to-be-wife, Martha Parker, left the comforts of home in Montreal for New York, the city then, much like today, was a pilgrimage site for the young and the arty and ambitious. But it was also becoming a city of greed, where both life's consolations and its necessities were increasingly going to the highest bidder. At the Stranger's Gate builds a portrait of this moment in New York through the story of their journey--from their excited arrival as aspiring artists to their eventual growth into a New York family. Gopnik transports us to their tiny basement room on the Upper East Side--the smallest apartment in Manhattan--and later to SoHo, where he captures a unicorn: an affordable New York loft. Between tender, laugh-out-loud reminiscences, including affectionate portraits of New York luminaries from Richard Avedon to Robert Hughes and Jeff Koons, Gopnik takes us into the corridors of Condé Nast, the galleries of MoMA and many places between to illuminate the fascinating world capital of creativity and aspiration that is New York, then and now.

Adam Gopnik is McNally Robinson Booksellers Author of the Month for September.

AdamGopnik Sept Author ofthe Month

A staff writer for the New Yorker since 1986, Adam Gopnik was born in Philadelphia and raised in Montreal. He is a three-time winner of the National Magazine Award for Essays and for Criticism and a George Polk Award winner for Magazine Reporting. In March of 2013, he was awarded the medal of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French Republic. His books include Paris to the Moon (2000), Through The Children’s Gate (2006), and the fiftieth anniversary Massey Lecture published in 2011, Winter: Five Windows on the Season. He lives in New York City with his wife and their two children.

 

 

 

OnceMoreWithFeelingMéiraCookOnce More with Feeling by Méira Cook

After twenty years Max Binder is still in love with his fiery wife, Maggie, and is determined to get her the perfect fortieth birthday gift. But Max’s singular desire — to make his wife happy — leads to an unexpected event that changes the course of his family’s life and touches the people who make up their western prairie city.

Set over the course of a single year, Once More With Feeling tells the story of a community through intersecting moments and interconnected lives. The colourful citizens who make up this city — bisected by railway lines and rivers, connected by boulevards and back alleys — are marked by transformation, upheaval, and loss: the worker at a downtown soup kitchen who recognizes a kindred spirit amongst the homeless; the aging sisters who everywhere see the fleeting ghosts of two missing neighbourhood children; a communal voice of mothers anxious for the future of their children in the discomfiting world they inhabit — this place of memory, amnesia, longing, and belonging.

Featuring a cast of eclectic characters, Once More With Feeling is about a community, about a family, and about the way time makes fond fools of us all. Award-winning author Méira Cook has crafted a novel that is at once funny, poignant, and yes, full of feeling.

Méira Cook is the award-winning author of the novels The House on Sugarbush Road, which won the McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award, and Nightwatching, which won the Margaret Laurence Award for Fiction. She has also published five poetry collections, most recently Monologue Dogs, which was shortlisted for the 2016 Lansdowne Prize for Poetry and for the 2016 McNally Robinson Book of the Year Award. She has won the CBC Poetry Prize and the inaugural Walrus Poetry Prize. She has served as Writer in Residence at the University of Manitoba’s Centre for Creative Writing and Oral Culture, and the Winnipeg Public Library. Born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa, she now lives in Winnipeg.

Join Méira Cook for the launch of Once More With Feeling Monday October 2, 7:00 pm in the atrium of McNally Robinson BooksellersMonday October 2, 7:00 pm  in the atrium of McNally Robinson Booksellers.

 

 

 

Runaway Wives and Rogue Feminists by Margo Goodhand RunawayWivesAndRogueFeministsMargoGoodhand

In the supposedly enlightened ’60s and ’70s, violence against women was widespread. It wasn’t talked about, and women had few, if any, options to escape their abusers. Yet in 1973 — with no statistics, no money and little public support — five disparate groups of Canadian women quietly opened Canada’s first battered women’s shelters. Today, there are well over 600.

In Runaway Wives and Rogue Feminists, journalist Margo Goodhand tracks down the “rogue feminists” whose work forged an underground railway for women and children, weaving their stories into an unforgettable — and until now untold — history.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TheTobacconistRobertSeethalerThe Tobacconist by Robert Seethaler

From The Man Booker International Prize finalist Robert Seethaler comes a tender, heartbreaking story about one young man and his friendship with Sigmund Freud during the Nazi occupation of Vienna.

Seventeen-year-old Franz Huchel journeys to Vienna to apprentice at a tobacco shop. There he meets Sigmund Freud, a regular customer, and over time the two very different men form a singular friendship. When Franz falls desperately in love with the music hall dancer Anezka, he seeks advice from the renowned psychoanalyst, who admits that the female sex is as big a mystery to him as it is to Franz.

As political and social conditions in Austria dramatically worsen with the Nazis’ arrival in Vienna, Franz, Freud, and Anezka are swept into the maelstrom of events. Each has a big decision to make: to stay or to flee?

 

 

To read more about these selections and more go to mcnallyrobinson.com.

 And don't forget to tune in the first Friday of every month when McNally's Chris Hall will join Michael Wolch live in the Classic 107 studio @ 8:30 AM to give us his picks!

Missed our inaugural WHAT TO  READ segment? Watch the video here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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